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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


Welcome to HPR the Community Podcast Network

We started producing shows as Today with a Techie 9 years, 3 months, 20 days ago. Our shows are produced by listeners like you and can be on any topic that "are of interest to hackers". If you listen to HPR then please consider contributing one show a year. If you record your show now it could be released in 8 days.

Latest Shows


hpr1691 :: Arduino 101 Arduino IO

In this episode, learn how to read and write input and output from the Arduino.

Hosted by klaatu on 2015-01-26 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

In this two-part series, Klaatu introduces you to the Arduino. First, learn about the breadboard and how to make electricity course through it in order to power your very own simple circuit.

To follow along with what Klaatu is talking about, refer to these two graphics:

And here are diagrams of the simple circuits that Klaatu constructs.

image: a diagramme of the simple circuit in todays show

The simple code to reset the servo:

#include <Servo.h>
Servo myservo;

int servoPosition;

void setup()
{
  myservo.attach(13);
  myservo.write(90);
}

void loop() {}

And the code that responds to input:

#include <Servo.h>
Servo myservo; 

int servoPosition;
int servoMax = 180;
int servoMin = 0;

int value;
int valMax = 600;
int valMin = 50;


void setup()
{
  myservo.attach(13);
}

void loop() 
{
  value = analogRead(0);
  servoPosition = map(value, valMin, valMax, servoMax, servoMin);
  servoPosition = constrain(servoPosition, servoMin, servoMax);
  myservo.write(servoPosition);
}

And here is a bonus diagramme that you can try to create, using a light sensor, servo, and resistor.

image: homework

hpr1690 :: Arduino 101 Breadboard

learn how to use a breadboard.

Hosted by klaatu on 2015-01-23 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (1)

In this two-part series, Klaatu introduces you to the Arduino. First, learn about the breadboard and how to make electricity course through it in order to power your very own simple circuit.

To follow along with what Klaatu is talking about, refer to these two graphics:

And here are diagrams of the simple circuits that Klaatu constructs.

image: a diagram of the simplest circuit in todays show

image: a diagram of the switched circuit in todays show


hpr1689 :: Linux Voice magazine at OggCamp

Another interview from OggCamp with the guys from Linux Voice


Hosted by beni on 2015-01-22 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: OggCamp | Comments (0)

Corenominal and Beni talking to the guys of the newly founded Linux Voice magazine. It's a British Linux publication that's less than a year old.

We talked to them about why you would found a magazine these days, why their magazine is still relevant in the digital age and why kinds won't beat them at mario cart.

Linux Voice Cover

You find their magazine here:

http://www.linuxvoice.com/

and their superb Linux postcast by the same name here:

http://www.linuxvoice.com/category/podcasts/


hpr1688 :: Some useful tools when compiling software

Useful tools I found when compiling software, and creating a debian package.

Hosted by Rho`n on 2015-01-21 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

introduction

Hi this is Rho`n and welcome to my first submission to Hacker Public Radio. I have been working on an application using the Python programming language with the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) libraries for the GUI interface. After acquiring a new laptop and installing a fresh copy of Ubuntu on it, I decided to set up the build environment I needed to be able to work on my project. I have been building from source the EFL libraries along with the Python-EFL wrapper libraries. For the last couple machines on which I have built the software, I would use the standard configure, make, and make install procedure. This time around I decided to create a debian package to use for installing the libraries. It had been a few years since I had created a .deb, so I googled for some tutorials, and found mention of the checkinstall program. After reading a couple blog posts about it I decided to try it out. checkinstall is run instead of "make install" , and will create a .deb file, and then install the newly created package.

cut and tr commands

To help speed up the configure process, I had previously created a file from my other builds that is a grep of my history for all the various "apt get install" commands of the libraries the EFL software needs to compile. Since my current operating system was a freshly installed distribution of Ubuntu, I needed to install the build-essential package first. After looking through my install file, and I decided to create a single apt-get install line with all the packages listed, instead of running each of the installs seperately. I knew I could grep the file, and then pass that to awk or sed, but my skill with either isn't that great. I did a little searching to see what other tools were out there and found the cut command and the tr command. Cut lets you print part of a line. You can extract set a field delimeter with the -d option and then list a range of fields to be printed with the -f option. The tr command can replace a character. I used this to replace the new line character that was printed by the cut command to generate a single line of packages which I piped to a file. A quick edit of the file to add "sudo apt-get install" at the beginning, add execute permissions to the file, and now I have a nice, easy way to install all the needed libraries.

apt-file and checkinstall

At least that was the idea. After installing the libraries, and running configure, I still received errors that libraries were missing. The machines from which my list of libraries was generated, had all been used for various development purposes, so some needed libraries were already installed on them, and so their installation had passed out of my history. Besides echoing to standard out the file configure can't find, it also creates a log file: config.log. Between the two it is relatively easy to figure out what library is needed. Often the libraries needed included their name in the .deb which has to be installed, and finding them is easy with an apt-cache search and grep of the library name. The hardest ones to find were often the X11 based references. In this case, I needed the scrnsaver.h header file. After googling, I found a reference to the needed package (libxss-dev) on Stack Exchange. The answer also showed how to use the apt-file command to determine in which package a file is included. I wish I had run into this before, there a few times where it took a number of searches on the internet to figure out which package I needed to install, and "apt-file find" would have saved time and frustration. A very handy tool for anyone developing on a debian based distribution. As it turns out, that was the last dependency that needed resolved. After a successful configure, and successful compile using the make command, I was ready to try out checkinstall. Running sudo checkinstall, brings up a series of questions about your package, helping you fill out the needed .deb meta-data. I filled out my name and email, name for the package, short description of the package, and let everything else go to the suggested defaults. After, that hit enter and checkinstall will create a debian package and install it for you. If you run "apt-cache search <name of package>" you will see it listed, and "apt-cache show <name of package>" will give you the details you created for the package. There are warnings on the Ubuntu wiki not to use this method for packages to be included in an archive or in a ppa. It does work great for a local install, and would use it to install on machines on my local network.

conclusion

After a short side trip into development setup, I'm back writing my application on my new laptop. While I am a big fan of binary packages, Debian being the first GNU/Linux distribution I ever used, sometimes you need to dive in and compile software from source. For me running configure, make, make install has been the easiest way to do this, and these days it usually isn't too difficult to get even moderately complex applications and libraries to build. The most tedious part can be resolving all the dependencies. Now, with apt-file in my tool belt, it will be even faster and easier. I will also be using checkinstall for future compiles. I do like being able to use package management tools to install, and un-install software.

I hope others find these tools useful. I have posted links in the show notes to the pages about cut, tr, apt-file and checkinstall that led me to these tools. If you've made it this far, thanks for listening to my first post to HPR. As Ken Fallon points out, it's not an HPR episode until you have uploaded it to the server. So let those episode ideas flow from your brain, into your favorite recording device, and up to the HPR server. Let's keep HPR active, vibrant, and a part of our lives for years to come.


hpr1687 :: Podcast recommendations

Thaj goes through his podcast list and shares the shows that he finds to be the most interesting.

Hosted by Thaj Sara on 2015-01-20 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Podcast recommendations | Comments (0)

Linux / Floss Podcasts

Pop Culture General Podcasts

  • Podculture: Local folks who talk about nerdy things. (http://www.podculture.com/feed/)
  • The Mindrobbers: This show is run by a writer from my gernal area named Scott Carelli. I orginially heard of him through Podculture. I've followed his various podcasts for many years and this is the most recent incarnation. Although sometimes I don't always agree with his opinions I do always look forward to hearing them. (http://www.mindrobber.net/feed/)
  • Trekcast: My first undying love in this world is Star Trek. (http://trekcast.podbean.com/feed/)
  • The Doctor's Companion: Another podcast by Scott Carelli and gang. Good American centreic view of Doctor Who, another of my favorite shows. (http://www.thedoctorscompanion.us/?feed=rss2)
  • The Babylon Podcast: This show isn;t in production anymore, but if you are a fan of Babylon 5 (which I am) this is a great show that breaks down each episode, and interviews many of the stars from the show. (http://www.babylonpodcast.com/category/shows/feed/)
  • Fear the Boot: A great tabletop role playing game podcast (http://www.feartheboot.com/ftb/?feed=rss2)
  • Hiyaa Martial Arts Podcast: Must listening for martial artists (especially of the chinese martial arts persuasion). There are very few good martial arts podcasts out there that are not style specific. This fits the bill. One of the host practices the same style of kung fu that I do (although through a different branch of the family tree) and it's nice to see that perspective on other arts. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/HiyaaMartialArtsPodcast)
  • This American Life: NPR.. used to be an addict. (http://feeds.thisamericanlife.org/talpodcast)
  • Unfilter: Jupiter Broadcasting's version of No Agenda. I used to listen to No Agenda but I find that it has become too long, and they tend to go off the deep end on some of their annalysis in my opinion. I find Unfilter to be a little more grounded, and it's an hour and a half once a week. I'll still listen to No agenda from time to time, but not regularly since I found this. (http://www.jupiterbroadcasting.com/feeds/unfilterogg.xml)

Ham Radio Podcasts

Science Podcast

Buddhism

I listen to a lot of random budhism podcasts but this is the must listen to.

  • Buddhist Geeks: Modern take on culture, science and society's impact on Budhism. Tends to be academic, but I enjoy it. (http://feeds.feedburner.com/BuddhistGeeksPodcast)
  • Vedic Mythology and Mantras Podcast: While not Buddhist specifically I have always loved Vedic mythology and Indian music. In my mind the relationship between the Vedic traditions and Buddhist are similar to Judaism to Christianity. This podcast gies a short mythological story and a chant that goes along with it. It's no longer being produced but it has lots of episodes to listen to. (http://www.puja.net/wordpress/category/mythologypodcast/)

TWiT Shows


hpr1686 :: Interview with Joel Gibbard of OpenHand

An interview with Joel Gibbard founder of the prize winning Openhand project

Hosted by Steve Bickle on 2015-01-19 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Accessibility | Comments (0)

This show is an interview with Joel Gibbard founder of the OpenHand project. The interview was recorded on my phone which unfortunately created a few glitches. I've cleaned the audio up as best I can. Although frustrating, the occasional glitches have not caused anything to be missed that cannot be inferred from the context of the recording.

photo of the hand

After creating an artificial hand for his degree project Joel Gibbard wanted to continue the work on the hand with the goal of producing a workable prosthetic hand for $1000, so he launched the OpenHand project with a succesful IndieGoGo fundraiser. In this interview we learn more about the Dextrus hand, the project's progress to date, and hear of Joel's vision of affordable prosthetics for amputees worldwide.

For a short 4 minute introduction to the project see Joel's video at

The openhand designs and more information are available at


hpr1685 :: 45 - LibreOffice Calc - Styles and Templates Introduced

How the concepts of Styles and Templates can be useful in Spreadsheets


Hosted by Ahuka on 2015-01-16 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: LibreOffice | Comments (0)

When we were looking at Writer we saw that Styles and Templates are key concepts to using any word processor. They are not quite as central in spreadsheet use, and one can be a proficient user without resort to them, but they do give you control over the appearance of your spreadsheets, and can give the sheets you create uniform appearance. We discussed these ideas in great detail in our Writer tutorials, so I am going to hope that some of that knowledge has carried over here. Still, lets get to some basic concepts:


hpr1684 :: 5150 Shades of Beer Jacob Leinenkugels Winter Explorer Pack

fifty tries the Leinenkugels Explore pack


Hosted by FiftyOneFifty on 2015-01-15 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: 5150 Shades of Beer | Comments (0)

Jacob Lienenkugels Winter Explorer Pack "Chippewa Falls, WI since 1867"

Winters Bite - Do you know what it smells like when you open a tin of cocoa (the semi-sweet kind, not the unsweetend) and no matter how you do it, a litle of the powder puffs out? The best descrition I can give this beer is it tastes just like that smell, even down to the dryness. Neither cloyingly sweet or leaving you wondering who mixed the chocolate syrup into you beer, just a sublte taste of dry cocoa. This lager pours dark with very little head. This beer (my favorite it this group) is only available in the Explorer pack, and it's ABV and ingredients are not featured on leinie.com.

Helles Yeah - (German blonde lager, Helles means "light" in German, but unlike American beers, it refers only to color). Straw color, very clear, moderate head that disapears w/o lacing. Sublte flavor, a hit of hops and just slightly more than a pinch of pepper. 5.5 ABV Malts: Pale malts Hops: Five All-American hops including Simcoe and Citra

Cranberry Ginger Shandy - [From Wikipedia, Shandy is beer mixed with a soft drink, carbonated lemonade, ginger beer, ginger ale, or apple juice or orange juice.] Pours cloudy yellow amber, moderate head that disapears w/o lacing. Leinenkugel managed to resist the urge to color it red. Not as syrupy as Shock Top\'s Cranberry Belgian Ale, but unlike many fruit adjunct brews, neither is the flavor so subtle you have to go searching for it. I like to use ginger in cooking, and I can also detect the taste of that sweet spice in this weiss beer as well. 4.2% ABV Malts: Pale and Wheat Hops: Cluster Other: Natural cranberry and ginger flavors

Snowdrift Vanilla Porter - Pours dark brown with just a litle carmel color head that disipates imediately. Vanilla bean aroma. Vanilla flavor is perhaps more subtle than Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter, but there will be know doubt you are enjoying a beer flavored by vanilla and roasted malts, with a hint of chocolate to keep it from being too sweet. 6.0 ABV Malts: Two- and six- row Pale Malt, Caramel 60, Carapils, Special B, Dark Chocolate and Roasted Barley Hops: Cluster & Willamette Other: Real vanilla

BONUS ROUND -Leinenkugels Orange Shandy - Wheat beer, likely exactly the same one that's in the Cranberry Ginger Shandy, but in this case the tart/sweet orange juice taste dosn't completely obscure the flavor of the beer. I like them both, but I think I would grab the orange shandy on a hot day. 4.2% ABV Malts: Pale and Wheat Hops: Cluster Other: Natural orange flavor


hpr1683 :: Theater of the Imagination: Part 06

lostnbronx interviews Julie Hoverson, a modern audio drama enthusiast

Hosted by lostnbronx on 2015-01-14 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: THEATER OF THE IMAGINATION | Comments (1)

In this installment, lostnbronx interviews Julie Hoverson, a modern audio drama enthusiast of great experience and insight.

Check out Julie's wonderful audio content at:

http://www.19nocturneboulevard.net/Episodes.htm

and (primarily)

http://www.nineteennocturne.libsyn.com/


hpr1682 :: Introduction to the Netizen Empowerment Federation

Introduction to Netizen Empowerment Federation. It is short, so let me know if you'd like detail.

Hosted by daw on 2015-01-13 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

This is my first HPR release and I'm going to keep it short. If anyone is intertested in hearing more about any of the projects I mention here, I'm happy to do another show.

First, I just want to say that everything on Netizen Empowerment Federation (NEF) is released under a free culture license, though not all of the music selected by our presenters is free culture. Right now we are blog and podcast focused, but we would like to add digital creators of all types.

  • http://opensourceplayground.org/ I'm doing these sites in the order they were created, though I'm not sure if OSP or Sportazine was created first. Since OSP is the most closely related to HPR, I'm going to start with that. OSP started as a shared hosting gift for new developers. The idea was I could make people accounts on Dreamhost and they could test the latest free software. Since it wasn't a business, I didn't really promote it. It never took off. I had a few people in Wisconsin make accounts, but they barely used them. It's not really important why that idea failed, but eventually it just became a place for me to talk tech. lnxw48 aka lnxwalt is our current systems administrator and occasionally writes pieces for the site. Like all of our sites, we are always looking for contributors!
  • http://sportazine.com/ As far as I'm aware, Sportazine is the only site dedicated to sports and free culture. This means a lot of things. First it means, making sure online sports viewing works in free formats. It also means that there are free software fantasy sports implementations and that sports journalism happens under free culture licenses. Sportazine is a weird beast because we partnered with JMP Enterprise.
  • http://www.musicmanumit.com/ This is a collection of shows about remixable music. The main show features me and Tom of the band Lorenzo's Music. You can find his band on Jamendo, Spotify, Free Music Archive, and I'm sure plenty of other places.
  • http://law.musicmanumit.com/ The Lawcast is on hiatus and when it comes back will likely be less law focused and more just a catchall for more academic and policy-related stuff than we do on the main show. I'll probably talk a lot more about free software on the reboot, because it's not a topic Tom really cares much about. Tom is a GNU/Linux user, but he refuses to use anything but Skype or Hangout for recording the shows. I'll probably have on musicians that we wouldn't otherwise have on and thus a topic of conversation on those shows will be "Why won't you use Skype or Hangout?" I suspect most of the reasons will be free software focused, but they may also be privacy focused (not that they are unrelated).

  • http://punk.musicmanumit.com The punkcast is pretty much what it sounds like it is. Eventually I want to bring it back. Right now though, I need to focus on finding funding, because if I don't, my wife is going to kick me out. I hope this is resolved by the time you hear this. I'm recording on December 19.
  • https://cyberunions.org/ I think Cyberunions.org may have started before any of these, but I put it here due to the start of the Cyberunions podcast, which is currently on hiatus. Stephen now works for the FSF, so you know free software is important to him. I'm not going to say much about the show, because aside from being a one-time guest, I'm not involved in the project. If people want to know more about Cyberunions, I suggest you pester Stephen (aka mv) about doing a show.
  • http://rynothebearded.com/ RTB really refers to two music shows, one called OO (pronounced "oh-oh") and one called Unformatted. The site also has a stream that carriers a variety of shows, including Cerebral Mix, Rage and Frustration, and the last NEF show I am going to discuss.