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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.


Correspondent

Tony Hughes AKA TonyH1212

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I'm a middle age bloke who enjoys using and talking about computers and open source software. I started using Linux in 2006 and have been using it as my Operating System on all my PC's for the last 7 years. I'm also an avid cook and enjoy creating new vegetarian recipes as I have been a vegetarian for over 26 years.
I have an occasional Blog at: http://tony-hughes.blogspot.co.uk/


email: tonyhughes1958.nospam@nospam.gmail.com
episodes: 15

hpr2286 :: Surviving a Stroke

Released on 2017-05-08 under a CC-BY-SA license.

First off a disclaimer: anything I say here is my experience and is in no way intended as advice to anyone, everyone who experiences or is at risk of a stroke is different and you must make your own lifestyle choices based on professional advice.

That clear lets get on with my show. On the 2nd February 2017 I had a Stroke, it came completely without warning. I was out with my wife, just about to start a Bridge class we were attending. I sat down at the table and just after sitting down was blasted with what I thought was White Noise from faulty hearing aids. After quickly removing them without any effect I thought I was having a sudden severe migraine, which I have from time to time. However I was unable to communicate what was happening and after several minutes my wife wrote on a paper the words “Home” and “Hospital” and I pointed to hospital. An Emergency ambulance was duly called and I was transferred to the local Emergency Department. Several hours later in the early hours of the next morning they admitted me, still not sure what had happened. It was only after a scan that afternoon that they concluded that I had had a Stroke.

I was seen by a consultant that evening who confirmed this and as I still had residual problems on my right side concluded that it was a stroke, and not a TIA (Transient Ischaemic Attack) or a mini stroke as it is sometimes called. I spent the next 12 days in hospital having further tests, including another scan, an MRI as opposed to the previous CT scan I had had on admission. After seeing the results of this scan the Consultant was amazed that I was not more severely affected, in other cases of the type of stroke I suffered the physical and cognitive damage is much more severe. It was looking like I had thankfully, dodged a bullet.

That is not to say there were no effects. My right side was effected and the fine motor control was damaged. Coordination in using my right hand and arm were initially difficult as was writing (I am predominantly right handed). Also my mouth felt like I was wearing someone’s false teeth, even though I have all my own. However the main effect has been fatigue, initially severe, but as I write this 6 weeks later this is starting to improve, although I still tire after 2-3 hours doing things that I could have done all day previously. I also still have a little feeling of weakness in my right hand and arm and writing is still an issue, thankfully most of my writing is done on a keyboard.

So what caused it I hear you yelling, well the truth is they don’t know. The most serious risks are to people that Drink alcohol excessively, Smoke and have a high fat diet. Also those over weight particularly the obese, and people with diabetes are high risk. Another major risk factor is genetic, and I remembered afterwards that my Grandfather and an Uncle had major strokes that ultimately led to their deaths. Also stress and high blood pressure can be a factor.

I don’t drink or smoke and have been a vegetarian for many years, also my blood pressure is checked regularly and was always seen as within normal range. However I was at the time of the stroke 21lb over weight, but even before it happened I had lost 7lb. Since the stroke the blood tests also show I am pre-diabetic so I need to increase my exercise (again something I had started to do), and alter my diet to reduce my blood sugars. Not major issues as I had started to attend a gym and walk more as part of the weight loss plan, and I actually prefer healthy food, and now have a reason to say to people when I’m in company why I eat what and the way I do.

The main effect for me has been the restriction on my mobility as the Consultant will not let me drive until 3 months post discharge (14th May), which means I have to rely on others or get public transport, this is not the problem but having to walk from transport stops to where I’m going is due to the fatigue. Roll on May 14th.

I thought I would record this show as a bit of a warning, and for listeners to realise that a Stroke can and does happen to anyone. On a positive note there is life after stroke and even for those who are more seriously disabled by a stroke many can and do recover most if not all the function they had before hand.

Further info on Stroke can be found here:

https://www.stroke.org.uk/

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stroke/pages/introduction.aspx


hpr2280 :: Lenovo X61s Part 2

Released on 2017-04-28 under a CC-BY-SA license.

HPR episode on Lenovo X61s part 2

  • Cost £36 including auction fees
  • OS Free (any Linux will work well)
  • Upgrade to 120Gig SSD £40 of ebay
  • Total outlay £76

If you have to buy one then get an OS free one and don't pay more than £80-£100 depending if it has an SSD or not

Hello HPR, a few episodes ago I talked of using the Lenovo X61s with Watt OS and said I would report back after a possible upgrade to the laptop with and SSD replacement for the hard drive.

Well I duly ordered and received a Drevo 120 Gig SSD from ebay. These are about £40 each so make a cheap upgrade to an older laptops spinning disc see review here:

http://www.enostech.com/drevo-x1-240gb-ssd-review/

after installing the PC with WattOS while it did everything you would need of an OS and was absolutely fine on the X61s I was a bit disillusioned with the amount of configuration needed to get all the software I needed working, definitely not New user friendly.

Looking at other lite Linux distributions I came upon Linux Lite

https://www.linuxliteos.com/

and decided that this might be a better choice as it says it is aimed at new users, and being based on Ubuntu was a familiar beast. ISO was downloaded and duly installed on the X61s and as soon as all the updates were completed I looked at the installed software and it was more comprehensive but not at the expense of still being lightweight.

At first Boot it takes about 300mb of ram and even with the word processor and Firefox in use Ram usage was only about 700mb.

Audacity after install worked out of the box, and I've already recorded and uploaded another show for HPR using the X61s and all went flawlessly. With the new SSD I am getting close to 5 hours of use from the 8 cell 63W battery installed on the PC and while I recognize the X61s being over 10 years old is not going to meet the needs of a power user, its fully capable of being an everyday laptop for basic office tasks, some light audio editing, and even photo editing in GIMP. I was able to edit and process a 10mb .jpg image without any issues and exporting the final image took seconds.

I was fairly happy with the X61s performance with the 80Gig spinner it came with, but the addition of an SSD has both improved performance and battery life to the extent that I would happily take it on the road as my only PC. Actually for the porpoise of writing this review I've lived with it as my main PC for almost 2 weeks and have not really missed its big brother the X230i i3 laptop I also have. In fact I was going to record a show using that and found that as it has a composite Audio jack, and my head set requires separate mic and headphone sockets I wasn't able to, so one up to the X61s there.

Conclusion, if you have a couple of kids and you're looking for a laptop for them to do homework, watch Utube, and surf the web (parental controls enabled) then I would look no further. And if they get broken by said kids you've not lost a bundle of dosh.


hpr2271 :: Raspberry Pi Zero W

Released on 2017-04-17 under a CC-BY-SA license.

In this episode I talk about the new Raspberry Pi Zero W single board computer released on 28th February 2017 to coincide with the 5th Birthday of the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

This tiny 65x30mm single board PC has the following specs

  • 1GHz, single-core CPU
  • 512MB RAM
  • Mini HDMI and USB On-The-Go ports
  • Micro USB power
  • HAT-compatible 40-pin header
  • Composite video and reset headers
  • CSI camera connector
  • 802.11 b/g/n wireless LAN
  • Bluetooth 4.1
  • Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)

Here are a couple of links to the foundation and a fuller review

https://www.raspberrypi.org/

https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/28/raspberry-pi-zero-w-is-a-10-computer-with-wifi-and-bluetooth/


hpr2265 :: WattOS on Lenovo X61s

Released on 2017-04-07 under a CC-BY-SA license.

This is a follow on show from the one about WattOS on the Acer AspireOne I did recently.

I talk about installing and running of the OS on this 10+ year old laptop and how they are still a viable option as a cheap laptop.

Note all the recording, and uploading to HPR of this episode was done on the X61s

http://planetwatt.com/new/

https://www.cnet.com/uk/products/lenovo-thinkpad-x61s/review/

https://support.lenovo.com/gb/en/documents/pd012148


hpr2257 :: Watt OS

Released on 2017-03-28 under a CC-BY-SA license.

In this short episode I tell you about installing Watt OS onto an Acer Aspire One Netbook from 2008.

This net book came with a 8Gig SSD installed and a 32bit 1.6G atom processor and many modern Linux spins are just too big for the hardware.

However Watt OS came to the rescue and installed on the Netbook without issue.

I plan to give it a go on a Lenovo x61 shortly and will let you know how that works out, my thought is it will fly on that hardware.

http://wiki.planetwatt.com


hpr2157 :: BarCamp Manchester part 3

Released on 2016-11-08 under a CC-BY-SA license.

This is an interview with Alan O'Donohoe which I did at BarCamp Manchester. The links to his Twitter page and the Exa Foundation are as follows:


hpr2151 :: BarCamp Manchester part 2

Released on 2016-10-31 under a CC-BY-SA license.

An Interview with Claire Dodd, the organiser of BarCamp Manchester

An Interview with Damion of Layershift Hosting, one of the sponsors of BarCamp Manchester


hpr2144 :: An Interview with All About Code at Manchester BarCamp

Released on 2016-10-20 under a CC-BY-SA license.

This is a follow up interview with Joshua Lowe as he has been very busy developing further python tools for the Raspberry Pi

http://www.allaboutcode.co.uk/

The interview took place at BarCamp Manchester http://www.barcampmanchester.co.uk/ on the 24th September 2016 after he had done a talk about EduBlocks his new project for programming in Python and part of his Edupython project.

http://www.edupython.co.uk/

Josh will be at https://mozillafestival.org/ at the end of October and will be presenting his project again.


hpr2101 :: What's on my podcatcher

Released on 2016-08-22 under a CC-BY-SA license.

A short show about the podcasts I like to listen to.


hpr2097 :: New Toys

Released on 2016-08-16 under a CC-BY-SA license.

Hi HPR listeners this is Tony Hughes talking from Blackpool UK

I did a show a few weeks ago about my Geek Bags but didn’t talk about the Desktop PC I use and as I’ve just upgraded to a new (used) PC I thought I would tell the story of my Desktop PC’s over the years.

I was a latecomer to the world of personal computing having been at school in the Late 60’s and early 70’s when we hadn’t even got calculators, if you were lucky to be able to work out the intricacy of it you may have had use of a slide rule. Even after calculators started to be more widely used I had a lecturer at college while studying marine engineering, that was so good with his slide rule and mental calculation, he could, and would often work out equations far faster than those of us using a calculator.

I first came across my first IBM clone PC back at college in 1987 while studying a control systems course this was a Intel 286 PC which the college ran CAD/CAM software on and we used it to learn how to create engineering drawings electronically. This would be the last time I used a computer until the early 1990’s when by then I had changed career and become a Registered Nurse. I was working in a residential nursing home and we had access to a Windows 3.xx PC which I would use to create templates of the clinical paperwork we used for record keeping.

Around this time I met my then wife to be and she needed a PC for the University Course she was on so we obtained a used Intel 386 PC from a Friend and upgraded the Ram from 1Mb to 4Mb which cost nearly half the price we paid for the PC £120, which in 1993 was a good chunk of cash. It was a time when there was a world shortage of Ram and offices were getting burgled just for the memory in the office PC’s.

While we had this PC in the house it didn’t much interest me at the time, this was pre internet days for the average user, we weren’t on line at work and the Word processing software was Dos based and I hated using it, so would do the odd things I needed to at work during my break.

Move forward 5 years and Windows 95 had taken over the world and there was this wonderful new OS called Windows 98 starting to appear in the shops. In September 1998 I went back to do a Nursing Degree in my specialist area of practice and found that we were required to submit all our course work in word processed format, no long hand written assignments this time around. So I decided that I would invest in a new home PC.

There were a couple of Big Box PC retailers in the UK at the time that advertised heavily in the press and on TV and I chose to go to one of these and bought a PC with the following specs:   

Pentium 2 350 CPU, 128Mb Ram, 6Gig HDD, 56k modem and a DVD Rom. It also came bundled with a Scanner, Inkjet printer and software including MS Office for small Business. All for the grand total of £1400 which at the time was about a month’s take home pay so I had to pay for it with the flexible friend (my Credit Card for those of you too young to remember the ad’s)

I also signed up for an AOL account to access the internet over the 56k modem, dog slow now but at the time was the only affordable way us mere mortals could afford home internet access. I remember it could take a minute or 2 to render my Bank’s web site when I started online banking in 2001 and that was using compression software to reduce the bandwidth.

I used that PC to write all my college work and with the help of a couple of friends started to tinker with the PC, getting a 120 ZIP drive for it, and later adding a CD RW drive for storing documents and Photos that I’d scanned and later taken with my first digital Camera.

By 2002 the PC was starting to get a bit long in the tooth and I decided it was time for an upgrade and I had a PC built for me by a local shop with P4 2.5Ghz CPU 40Gig HDD and 512Mb Ram (later upgraded to 2Gig) and a CD RW drive again later upgraded to DVD RW drive. This PC cost me half of what I paid for the P2 four years previously and was to be the last PC I bought new, all the PC’s including laptops I’ve owned since this PC have been second hand. Some given by family or friends, some built from parts of Freecycle/Freegle, and lately PC’s I’ve bought at a local computer auction in the north west of the UK.

The title of this podcast is “New Toys” and so to the juicy bit, my Desktop for the last 6 years has been a Lenovo ThinkCentre 7373 Core 2 Duo PC with a 2.6Ghz CPU, 250Gig SSD, an upgrade from the 160Gig HDD it came with and 12Gig Ram also upgraded from the 4Gig it came with and requiring a bios flash to get the MB to support 16Gig. This rig has served me well but lately I have found it starting to feel its age and taking a long time to do things I now do regularly such as video and photo editing, Audio editing and virtual PC’s in virtualBox. So I decided it was time I looked around for an upgrade. As usual I was not in the market for a new PC, I could afford one but I don’t like splashing the cash unnecessarily. As luck would have it the monthly Auction catalog included a HP Compaq Elite 8300 i7 Micro Tower. I checked out the specs and liked what I read. So Monday 1st of August I took a trip to the auction and as luck would have it I became the proud owner of said PC for the princely sum of £212.80, hammer price of £190 plus commission.

The full spec of the PC is: i7 3.4Ghz CPU (22nm architecture) 4 cores and 8 threads, 8Gig Ram Supports 32Gig 500Gig HDD, DVD RW drive and a card reader. Also came with a Win7 pro CoA but no installed OS.

So it took me 10 minutes to install Linux Mint 18 and another 30 to complete the updates and install my software over and above the base install. It boots in just over a minute, which is only slightly slower than the old PC with an SSD, so I guess it will boot mega fast with an SSD upgrade, which is on the cards after I return from Holiday as may an upgrade to the Ram. I’ve already used some Ram from the old PC to increase to 12Gig but I need some matching 8Gig Ram to go to 16 or higher.

Well that charts my PC hardware journey over the last 20 odd years it’s amazing to think that one of the Raspberry Pi 3’s I own has more processing power than most of the hardware I’ve had up to the Core 2 Duo in 2010.


hpr2087 :: Magazines I read Part 2

Released on 2016-08-02 under a CC-BY-SA license.

Hi Hacker Public Radio this is Tony Hughes again with the second episode about the magazines I like to read. All of the magazines I’ll be talking of today I read on my Magzter (www.magzter.com) Application on my tablet. I have a Magzter Gold subscription which gives me access to literally 100’s of magazines.

  • Vegetarian Times (www.vegetariantimes.com)
    I’m a bit of a foodie and have been a vegetarian for many years, so access to good food magazines is important to me. This is a US publication so not all the advertised products are available in the UK but the articles and recipes are excellent.

  • Feel Good Food (www.womanandhome.com/recipes/534618/feel-good-food-mag)
    A British magazine aimed at Women but non the less still a source of some brilliant recipes for delicious food for food lovers everywhere. Not a veggie magazine but there is usually something of interest. Like most of the food magazines I read I dip into them find recipes I like save them and move on.

Moving on from food to Sci Fi and cult fiction.

I’ve grouped these together as they both deal with this subject. They review the latest books, films, TV, comics and audio recordings for this genre . They also cover classic examples, often examining work from the so called golden age of a particular subject. Along with Total Film magazine (www.gamesradar.com/totalfilm) you will always have access to reviews of the latest films & TV and if they are worth the price of a cinema ticket or space as a series record on your PVR.

Another armchair hobby of mine is archaeology I’ve loved Time Team from the beginning. So my next magazine on Magzter is Archaeology (archaeology.org) this is a bi monthly magazine published in the US, but covering the latest archaeological news from around the world. For someone into my modern technology its interesting to read about what the latest technology was hundreds or even thousands of years ago.

Moving on, one of my other interests over the last 20 years has been motorcycles although I no longer ride I still retain an keen interest so a Bike magazine has to be something I dip into to drool over shiny metal every so often. So I currently have Back Street Heroes (www.backstreetheroes.com) as a favourite in Magzter and dip into it when I need a shiny metal fix.

Finally a more active hobby of mine is photography so there has to be a photography magazine in this list. Amateur Photographer (photographer.magazinesdirect.com) claims to be the worlds oldest weekly photography magazine. It covers all aspect of photography and the equipment you need. From high end Professional stuff to point and shoot cameras, and all the other stuff from bags to flash lights.


hpr2076 :: What Magazines I read Part 1

Released on 2016-07-18 under a CC-BY-SA license.

Magazines I Read

Hi This is Tony Hughes for Hacker Public Radio, I'm trying to do a show once a month or so and I was thinking of ideas that might be of interest to the listeners out there.

While there are regular shows on 'What's on my pod-catcher' I've never heard one about what magazines that people in the HPR community like to read. With the advent of digital media and subscription services such as Issuu, Magzter, Google Play Newsstand and I'm sure many others which offer both Free and subscription content I'm sure many of you like me have quite a number of magazines you regularly read, and some you dip in to from time to time. So this show is about the Magazines I like to read.

First I'd like to say that to facilitate regularly reading of digital media I feel for me a 10" tablet is the smallest format for comfortable reading (although for those of you with young enough eyesight to be able to read small fonts with no difficulty you may feel different). However my Tablet of choice is the 12" Samsung SM-P900 which I purchased in February 2015. My only gripe with this tablet is I'll probably never get Android 6 on it as it's now over 2 years since original release. While I agree with Apple that the 4:3 screen configuration for reading on a tablet is more user friendly I can not bring myself to spend that kind of money or be tied to the Apple ecosystem.

So what Magazines do I actually read?

  • Linux Voice (https://www.linuxvoice.com) This is a Linux magazine that was set up a couple of years ago by some of the former editorial team from Linux Format after a successful Kick Starter Campaign. Good content for and about Linux and the Linux community and they support the community by distributing 50% of their annual profits back to the Open Source Community after a ballot of readers. They also release issues of the magazine with a creative commons licence 9 months after publication. This is the only magazine I currently have a Paper subscription to (it also comes with a free DRM free PDF copy for subscribers)

  • Linux Format (http://www.linuxformat.com) Similar in content to Linux Voice but without quite the same community philosophy, but still a very good publication.

  • MicroMart (http://subscribe.micromart.co.uk) This is a more general computer magazine that started in 1985, as a place you could buy and sell computers and components but is now more of a regular weekly magazine format with news, reviews and articles about all things computer and technology related. As I said in my Journey to Linux show this was the Magazine that introduced me to Linux in the late 90's early 00's. They still have a weekly Linux page and regular Raspberry Pi and other Linux related content.

  • MagpPi (https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi) This is the official Monthly magazine of the Raspberry Pi Community and as you will have worked out is focused on all things Raspberry Pi. Lots of Good content including: News, tutorials, and reviews of new peripherals for the Pi, and since being brought in house by the foundation it has a very professional look and feel about it. All the content is provided by members of the Raspberry Pi Community both from inside, and outside the Foundation. You can get a free Creative commons PDF from the website or to support the foundation you can subscribe to both Print and digital copies if you wish to.

  • Full Circle Magazine (http://fullcirclemagazine.org/) This is a completely community driven magazine for all things related to Ubuntu Linux and its derivatives. They carry news of what is happening in the World of Ubuntu and articles and tutorials of how to use Linux software for both the beginner and more experienced users. This is a Creative Commons and can be downloaded free from the website in both PDF and e-book formats.

  • PCLinuxOS Magazine (http://pclosmag.com/index.html) This is another community driven magazine from The PCLinuxOS community and is similar to Full Circle in its content, with the aim of helping users of this distro to get the most out of it they can. Also available as a free Creative Commons PDF download from their website.


hpr2065 :: Whats in My Bag

Released on 2016-07-01 under a CC-BY-SA license.
  • 0.00 Intro

  • 0.38 Lenovo x201

  • 1.10 Lenovo x200 Tablet

  • 1.30 Lenovo x61s

  • 2.25 Raspberry Pi stuff

  • 3.55 Portable HDD

  • 4.24 sign off


hpr2056 :: Interview with a young hacker

Released on 2016-06-20 under a CC-BY-SA license.

The following interview is with a young member of the Maker Space and Raspberry Pi community here in the North West of the UK.

You can find more of Josh's work at:
http://allaboutcode.wix.com/home

Blackpool Makerspace and LUG
https://blackpoolmakerspace.wordpress.com/

Blackpool Raspberry Jam
http://blackpoolraspberryjam.co.uk/


hpr2051 :: My Linux Journey

Released on 2016-06-13 under a CC-BY-SA license.
  • 0.00 Introduction

  • 0.40 Computer History

  • 6.25 Linux and Freecycle

  • 8.50 Current PC and Distro

  • 9.10 Helping/converting others


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