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Hacker Public Radio

Your ideas, projects, opinions - podcasted.

New episodes Monday through Friday.



Welcome to HPR the Community Podcast Network

We started producing shows as Today with a Techie 11 years, 1 months, 28 days ago. Our shows are produced by listeners like you and can be on any topic that "are of interest to Hackers". If you listen to HPR then please consider contributing one show a year. If you record your show now it could be released in 15 days.


Latest Shows


hpr2175 :: Kdenlive Part 4 Colour Correction

A review of the Kdenlive colour correction suite


Hosted by Geddes on 2016-12-02 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (0)

Hello again HPR listeners this is Geddes back with Part 4 in the series covering the video editing application KdenLive. This time round we’ll be looking at colour correction which covers the following topics:

  • Workflow
  • The human element
  • Luma values
  • Levels
  • Colours
  • Things that look broken
  • Saturation
  • Copying values between clips
  • Colour Effects
  • Selective colour correction and rotoscoping

Here’s the link to the original article.


hpr2174 :: Dungeoneer Tabletop Game

Klaatu reviews the Dungeoneer RPG card game

Hosted by klaatu on 2016-12-01 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Tabletop Gaming | Comments (0)

Klaatu reviews the RPG card game, Dungeoneer, especially concentrating upon solitaire play.

If you're keen to play, you'll want to use Klaatu's re-write of the official rules, or his re-write and touch-up of the unofficial solo rules. Neither of these are unique in themselves, but Klaatu humbly believes that they're a lot easier to comprehend than those online or in the box.


hpr2173 :: Driving a Blinkt! as an IoT device

I have a Raspberry Pi Zero with a Blinkt! 8-LED array I'm setting up as a notification device


Hosted by Dave Morriss on 2016-11-30 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (5)

Driving a Blinkt! as an IoT device

Introduction

I managed to buy a Raspberry Pi Zero when they first came out in December 2015. This was not easy since they were very scarce. I also bought a first-generation case from Pimoroni and some 40-pin headers. With the Zero this header is not pre-installed and it’s necessary to solder it onto the Pi yourself.

I have had various project ideas for this Pi Zero, but had not decided on one until recently. Within the last month or two Pimoroni produced a device called the Blinkt! which has eight APA102 RGB LEDs and attaches to the GPIO header. This costs £5, just a little more than the Zero itself.

My plan was to combine the two and turn them into a status indicator for various things going on that needed my attention.

Long notes

I have written out a moderately long set of notes for this episode and these are available here http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2173/full_shownotes.html.


hpr2172 :: Dutch Blitz Table Top Game

Steve describes the game of Dutch Blitz.


Hosted by Steve Saner on 2016-11-29 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Tabletop Gaming | Comments (0)

Dutch Blitz Tabletop Game

Origin

Dutch Blitz was created by Werner Ernst George Muller, from Pennsylvania, in the United States, in 1959. It is similar to the game Nertz, which is played with standard playing cards. Nertz had been around since the 1940s. It isn’t totally clear to what extent Mr Muller was influenced by the game of Nertz. He was an optometrist and it is said that he thought the game might help his children learn about colors and numbers.

Theme

The game has a theme that originates with the Pennsylvania Dutch culture, which was formed by early German immigrants to eastern Pennsylvania in the United States. The symbols used on the cards are representative of that culture, which tended to be agricultural and of a conservative protestant Christian faith.

Cards

Each player has their own deck of cards. The standard set has 4 decks, so it can accommodate 2-4 players. There is an extension pack that adds 4 more decks, supporting 4 more players. Each deck has 40 cards made up of number cards from 1 through 10 in four different colors (suits): red, blue, green, and yellow. Additionally, the red and blue cards have a picture of a boy and the green and yellow cards have a picture of a girl. The decks are differentiated from each other by a symbol on the back side of each card. The four standard decks have the following symbols: pump, buggy, plow, and bucket.

Piles

  • Blitz Pile - A pile of 10 cards that are dealt by each player before game play starts. One of the goals is for the player to get rid of their Blitz pile. When one player clears their Blitz pile, the round is over.

  • Post Piles - Three piles of cards to the left of the Blitz pile that are used by the player to help sort through cards during the game play. These piles begin as 3 cards dealt out by the player before game play. Cards can then be added to these piles in descending order and alternating “gender”. If one of the Post piles is cleared, the player may take a card off of their Blitz pile to start a new one.

  • Wood Pile - During game play, the player rotates through their deck by taking 3 cards, face down, and turning them face up and placing them on the Wood pile. The top most card is available to be played.

  • Dutch Piles - During game play, players can start a Dutch pile when they have a playable card with the number 1 on it. These piles are placed in the middle of the table. The piles can then be built up, in sequential order and of matching color. Any player can play a card on any Dutch pile.

Game Play

The game is played in rounds. The players do not take turns. When play starts, all players begin playing at the same time as fast as they can. When a player is able to clear their Blitz pile, they shout the word “Blitz” and all play must then stop. That is the end of the round.

Points

When the round ends all of the cards that have been played on the Dutch piles are sorted into their representative decks. Each player counts the number of cards that they have played and then subtracts two times the number of cards left on their Blitz pile. That is their score for the round.

In order to maximize one’s points for a round, the objectives are two-fold. You want to play as many cards as possible on the Dutch piles, but you also want to get rid of as many cards on your Blitz pile as possible.

References


hpr2171 :: hello world

this first HPR podcast is to introduce myself and what I am about.


Hosted by spaceman on 2016-11-28 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (1)

I love programming, I make a living writing free software. However I am still a programmer without a keyboard. I want to share knowledge that gives us control over our own life. Tools that help us help ourselves.

Two main topics:

  1. computers (of course!)
    • everyday user
    • free software
    • programming
  2. AFK stuff
    • veganism,
    • minimalism,
    • botany,
    • engineering.

Lots of fun, life is interesting

happy hacking


hpr2170 :: soundtrap.io

A low-cost open-source acoustic logger for biodiversity and environmental monitoring.


Hosted by Ken Fallon on 2016-11-25 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Series: Interviews | Comments (2)

Back in hpr1894 :: Interview with Davide Zilli and Dr Marianne Sinka of the HumBug Project, the topic of an open-source acoustic logger came up. Today Ken tracks down Prof. Alex Rogers from the Department of Computer Science at University of Oxford, to talk about the project.

The prototype device is based on the Silicon Labs Gecko processor range and provides a low-cost acoustic logger which can record uncompressed audio to an SD card at 48,000 samples per second. Onboard acoustic recognition algorithms allow the device to decide when and what to record, and allow the computation and storage of acoustic features and complexity indices, rather than raw waveforms.

  • EFM32 Gecko processor
  • WAV recordings to SD card
  • 48,000 samples per second
  • Powered by 3 x AAA batteries
  • Analog MEMS microphone
  • Measures just 50 x 38 x 12 mm
  • Configurable USB interface
  • Onboard real time clock
acoustic logger

http://soundtrap.io/


hpr2169 :: How I connect to the awesome #oggcastplanet on mobile

I give a quick overview of the challenges of IRC on the go and how Riot and Matrix solve them for me


Hosted by clacke on 2016-11-24 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (1)

On HPR #2162 I mentioned that I'm connecting to freenode IRC using Riot and Matrix. Here I explain a bit of background to why, what Matrix is, and why you should use it too.

Quick-quick version

Just go to https://riot.im/app/#/room/#freenode_#oggcastplanet:matrix.org, click Join and you're on the channel! If you register a user there (or maybe on another instance, like @lambadalambda's https://matrix.heldscal.la/), you can then log in with the same username and password in the Android app and see all your joined channels there.

Correction to audio: Riot is on F-Droid. For some reason I couldn't find it at the time, even though it's clearly there, so I'm currently using the version from the Google Play Store. I hear that battery use may be an issue if you're independent from the evil GOOG.

Alternatives

Other ways of connecting to IRC over flaky or intermittent connections without losing context:

  • ZNC
  • In particular, check out this pretty elaborate ZNC-on-ZNC setup to solve the issue with having multiple devices that all want an independent scrollback buffer. I was just about considering setting up something like this when I discovered the Matrix bridge instead.
  • One colleague of mine uses Quassel and loves it.
  • Another colleague uses irssi ConnectBot or something similar and can't understand why anybody would want anything else.

Criticism

Fodder for further HPR episodes


hpr2168 :: Analogue Random Number Generation

Klaatu ponders analogue random number generation

Hosted by klaatu on 2016-11-23 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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Klaatu talks about different ways of coming up with random numbers without electronics.

Discussed: dice, flipping through a book, sequential modulo, shifting tables, and pocketdiceroller.


hpr2167 :: Google It

Discussing some of the successes Google has had despite people thinking Google is failing


Hosted by Bill "NFMZ1" Miller on 2016-11-22 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
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Discussing some of Google's successes. Lately I have been hearing a lot of flak towards Google and how they are doing everything wrong. So I go down a list of some of their success stories. Disagree? Email me.


hpr2166 :: How to use a Slide Rule

By popular request, a description of how a slide rule works


Hosted by Dave Morriss on 2016-11-21 and released under a CC-BY-SA license.
Listen in ogg, spx, or mp3 format. Comments (3)

How to use a Slide Rule

In my show 1664, “Life and Times of a Geek part 1”, I spoke about using a slide rule as a schoolboy. As a consequence, I was asked if I would do a show on slide rules, and this is it (after a rather long delay).

Long notes

I have written out a moderately long set of notes for this episode and these are available here http://hackerpublicradio.org/eps/hpr2166/full_shownotes.html.

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